Huntington Beach
Huntington Beach
Badlands National Park
Badlands National Park
Point Reyes National Seashore
Point Reyes National Seashore
Lands End: Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy
Lands End: Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy
Muir Woods
Muir Woods
Medicine Bow
Medicine Bow
Mount Evans
Mount Evans
North Park: State Forest State Park
North Park: State Forest State Park
Rocky Mountain National Park
Rocky Mountain National Park
Cades Cove: Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Cades Cove: Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Cataloochee Valley: Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Cataloochee Valley: Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Fontana: Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Fontana: Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Wild
Wild
Huntington BeachSee the rest of the series at neonat.squarespace.com/a-natural-sense-of-place/See the series at vimeo.com/channels/34719Music: Chris Zabriskie (chriszabriskie.com)The 2500 acre tract is a highlight of the South Carolina Park system. Ecosystems include fresh and saltwater marsh land as well as coastal habitats.
Badlands National ParkMusic: "The Temperature of the Air on the Bow of the Kaleetan" by Chris Zabriskie (chriszabriskie.com)The Badlands are a remarkably stunning and unique landscape. Bizarre and beautiful formations jut out of the fractured prairie in various shades of pink, red and yellow. Bison and bighorn sheep are a few of the parks multiple inhabitants.
Point Reyes National SeashoreMusic By: Chris Zabriskie, chriszabriskie.com/Point Reyes is remarkably diverse, both in wildlife and habitat. Listed as one of the top three wildlife viewing spots in California it's home most notably to the tule elk reserve and the wintering grounds of the elephant seal."From its thunderous ocean breakers crashing against rocky headlands and expansive sand beaches to its open grasslands, brushy hillsides, and forested ridges, Point Reyes offers visitors over 1500 species of plants and animals to discover. Home to several cultures over thousands of years, the Seashore preserves a tapestry of stories and interactions of people. Point Reyes awaits your exploration."nps.gov/pore/index.htm
Lands End: Golden Gate National Parks ConservancyMusic By: Chris Zabriskie, chriszabriskie.com/Lands End is an astoundingly beautiful natural wonder nestled between urban San Francisco and the Pacific."At every turn of the trail on this wild and rocky northwestern corner of San Francisco, there is another stunning view. Along the way you’ll see hillsides of cypress and wildflowers, views of old shipwrecks, access to the epic ruins of Sutro Baths, pocket beaches, and a new Lookout Visitor Center."parksconservancy.org/visit/park-sites/lands-end.html
Muir WoodsMusic By: Chris Zabriskie, chriszabriskie.com/A recent visit to the west coast allowed for a brief stop at Muir Woods National Monument redwood grove. Stunning."When John Muir learned that William and Elizabeth Kent were naming a redwood forest near San Francisco in his honor, he declared, 'This is the best tree-lovers monument that could possibly be found in all the forests of the world.'"nps.gov/muwo/index.htm
Medicine BowHere are a few shots from our second visit to North Park. See below for more information about the area.See the series at vimeo.com/channels/34719Music: Chris Zabriskie, chriszabriskie.comSFSP (or North Park as it seems to be more commonly called) was a favorite spot of my wife when we lived in Colorado. It's a great Moose viewing area. This visit, however, we had to head out to the Arapaho Wildlife Refuge to capture the four bulls featured in this piece.Wiki:State Forest State Park– A Colorado State Park located in Jackson and Larimer counties east of Walden, Colorado. The 70,838-acre (286.67 km2) park was established in 1970 in the Medicine Bow Range of the Rocky Mountains. Facilities include a visitors center, over 200 campsites, cabins, picnic sites, boat ramps and 94 miles (151 km) of hiking trails. About 52,000 acres (210 km2) of the park are forested in lodgepole pine, douglas fir, colorado blue spruce, aspen and other species. Wildlife in the park includes moose, bighorn sheep, black bear, mule deer and elk.Arapahoe Wildlife Refuge–The dry climate of the area (at an elevation of approximately 8800 feet) requires the diversion of water from the Illinois River through a complex system of ditches to irrigate wetland meadows and fill water fowl brood ponds. Periodic burning, irrigation and various grazing systems are management tools are used on the refuge meadows to maintain vegetative vigor for nesting purposes. Manipulation of water levels in the shallow ponds is intended to assure adequate aquatic vegetation for food and escape cover. The ponds also produce many insects and other invertebrates (protein) needed by most female waterfowl for successful egg laying. These insects also serve as an essential food item for the growth of ducklings and goslings during the summer months.The first waterfowl arrive at the refuge in the spring when the ice vanishes in April. The peak migration occurs in late May when 5,000 or more ducks may be present. Canada geese have been reestablished in North Park and begin nesting on the refuge during April. Duck nesting usually starts in early June and peaks in late June. The refuge produces about 9,000 ducklings and 150 to 200 goslings each year. The Fish and Wildlife Service expects that when refuge lands are fully acquired and developed, waterfowl production should increase significantly.Primary upland nesting species include the mallard, pintail, gadwall, and American wigeon. A number of diving ducks, including the lesser scaup and redhead, nest on the larger ponds and adjacent wet meadows. Most species may be observed during the entire summer season. Fall migration reaches its height in late September or early October when up to 8,000 waterfowl may be on the refuge.Moose–(North America) or Eurasian elk (Europe) (Alces alces) is the largest extant species in the deer family. Moose are distinguished by the palmate antlers of the males; other members of the family have antlers with a dendritic ("twig-like") configuration. Moose typically inhabit boreal and mixed deciduous forests of the Northern Hemisphere in temperate to subarctic climates. Moose used to have a much wider range but hunting and other human activities greatly reduced it over the years. Moose have been re-introduced to some of their former habitats. Their diet consist of both terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The most common moose predators are wolves, bears, and humans. Unlike most other deer species, moose are solitary animals and do not form herds. Although generally slow moving and sedentary, moose can become aggressive and move surprisingly fast if angered or startled. Their mating season in the autumn can lead to spectacular fights between males competing for the right to mate with a particular female.Antelope–The Pronghorn of North America, though sometimes known colloquially as Pronghorn Antelope, is not a member of the family Bovidae, but the family Antilocapridae and not a true antelope. No antelope species are native to the Americas. True antelope have horns which are unbranched and never shed, while Pronghorns have branching horns, and shed annually.
Mount EvansOriginal soundtrack by Matt Abeysekera.bromeliadmusic.comI selected this spot to visit in particular in hopes of seeing mountain goat. We were not disappointed. One surprise however was that my first shot of mountain goats turned out to be big horn sheep (first shot after opening). It was not till reviewing my footage several days later that I realized these were big horn ewes and not scraggly shedding mountain goats as I had first thought.Reading about these two species after filming this I discovered an interesting sub plot. The goat is allegedly displacing the sheep. It's a more aggressive species and is thought to perhaps carry disease that the sheep are susceptible to. The Bighorn have declined by about 10% over the last ten years and the Goat's territory has expanded (although wildlife officials are attempting to keep it in check).Wiki: Mount Evans is a mountain in the Front Range region of the Rocky Mountains, in Clear Creek County, Colorado. It is one of 54 fourteeners (mountains with peaks over 14,000 feet (4,300 m)) in Colorado, and the closest fourteener to Denver. It is often compared to Pikes Peak - another Front Range fourteener - which it exceeds in elevation by 154 ft (50 m).The peak is one of the characteristic Front Range peaks, dominating the western skyline of the Great Plains along with Pikes Peak, Longs Peak, and nearby Mount Bierstadt. Mount Evans can be seen from over 100 miles away to the east, and many miles in other directions. Mount Evans dominates the Denver Metropolitan Area skyline and can be seen from points south of Castle Rock, up to (65 miles (105 km) south) and as far north as Fort Collins (95 miles (153 km) north), and points east of Strasburg (105 miles (169 km) east). In the early days of Colorado tourism, Mount Evans and Denver were often in competition with Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs.Bighorn Sheep–Named for the large, curved horns borne by the rams (males). Ewes (females) also have horns, but they are shorter with less curvature.[14] They range in color from light brown to grayish or dark, chocolate brown, with a white rump and lining on the back of all four legs. Males typically weigh 127–316 pounds (58–143 kg), are 36–41 inches (91–100 cm) tall at the shoulder, and 69–79 inches (180–200 cm) long from the nose to the tail. Females are typically 75–188 pounds (34–85 kg), 30–36 inches (76–91 cm) tall and 54–67 inches (140–170 cm) long.[15] Male bighorn sheep have large horn cores, enlarged cornual and frontal sinuses and internal bony septa. These adaptations serve to protect the brain by absorbing the impact of clashes.[16] Bighorn sheep have pre-orbital glands on the anterior corner of each eye, inguinal glands in the groin and pedal glands on each foot. Secretions from these glands may support dominance behaviors.[16]Bighorns from the Rocky Mountains are relatively large, with males that occasionally exceed 500 lb (230 kg) and females that exceed 200 lb (90 kg). In contrast, Sierra Nevada Bighorn males weigh up to only 200 lb (90 kg) and females to 140 lb (60 kg). Males' horns can weigh up to 30 lb (14 kg), as much as the rest of the bones in the male's body.[17]Mountain Goat–Both male and female mountain goats have beards, short tails, and long black horns, 15–28 cm in length, which contain yearly growth rings. They are protected from the elements by their woolly white double coats. The fine, dense wool of their undercoats is covered by an outer layer of longer, hollow hairs. In spring, mountain goats moult by rubbing against rocks and trees, with the adult billies (males) shedding their extra wool first and the pregnant nannies (females) shedding last. In the winter, their coats help them to withstand temperatures as low as −50 °F (−46 °C) and winds of up to 100 mph (160 km/h).A billy stands about three feet (1 m) at the shoulder to the waist. Male goats also have longer horns and a longer beard than nannies. Mountain goats typically weigh between 100 and 300 lbs (45–136 kg);[2] females are usually 10-30% lighter than males.Nannies can be very competitive and protective of their space and food sources. They will fight with one another for dominance in conflicts that can ultimately include all the nannies in the herd. In these battles, nannies will circle each other with their heads lowered, showing off their horns. As with fights between billies during breeding season, these conflicts can occasionally lead to injury or even death, but they are largely harmless. To avoid fighting, an animal may show a posture of non-aggression by stretching low to the ground.In lower regions below the tree line, nannies also use their fighting abilities to protect themselves and their offspring from predators, such as wolves, wolverines, cougars, lynx and bears. Even though their size protects them from most potential predators in higher altitudes, nannies still must defend their young from golden eagles, which can be a threat to very young kids. Nannies have even been observed trying to dominate the more passive bighorn sheep that share some of their territory.Mountain goats can occasionally be aggressive towards humans, with at least one reported fatality resulting from an attack by a mountain goat.[4]The mountain goat's feet are well-suited for climbing steep, rocky slopes, sometimes with pitches of 60 degrees or more, with inner pads that provide traction and cloven hooves that can be spread apart as needed. Also, the tips of their feet have dewclaws that are sharp to keep them from slipping.
North Park: State Forest State ParkOriginal soundtrack by Angus MacRae.angus-macrae.co.ukSFSP (or North Park as it seems to be more commonly called) was a favorite spot of my wife when we lived in Colorado. It's a great Moose viewing area. This visit, however, we had to head out to the Arapaho Wildlife Refuge to capture the four bulls featured in this piece.Wiki:State Forest State Park– A Colorado State Park located in Jackson and Larimer counties east of Walden, Colorado. The 70,838-acre (286.67 km2) park was established in 1970 in the Medicine Bow Range of the Rocky Mountains. Facilities include a visitors center, over 200 campsites, cabins, picnic sites, boat ramps and 94 miles (151 km) of hiking trails. About 52,000 acres (210 km2) of the park are forested in lodgepole pine, douglas fir, colorado blue spruce, aspen and other species. Wildlife in the park includes moose, bighorn sheep, black bear, mule deer and elk.Arapahoe Wildlife Refuge–The dry climate of the area (at an elevation of approximately 8800 feet) requires the diversion of water from the Illinois River through a complex system of ditches to irrigate wetland meadows and fill water fowl brood ponds. Periodic burning, irrigation and various grazing systems are management tools are used on the refuge meadows to maintain vegetative vigor for nesting purposes. Manipulation of water levels in the shallow ponds is intended to assure adequate aquatic vegetation for food and escape cover. The ponds also produce many insects and other invertebrates (protein) needed by most female waterfowl for successful egg laying. These insects also serve as an essential food item for the growth of ducklings and goslings during the summer months.The first waterfowl arrive at the refuge in the spring when the ice vanishes in April. The peak migration occurs in late May when 5,000 or more ducks may be present. Canada geese have been reestablished in North Park and begin nesting on the refuge during April. Duck nesting usually starts in early June and peaks in late June. The refuge produces about 9,000 ducklings and 150 to 200 goslings each year. The Fish and Wildlife Service expects that when refuge lands are fully acquired and developed, waterfowl production should increase significantly.Primary upland nesting species include the mallard, pintail, gadwall, and American wigeon. A number of diving ducks, including the lesser scaup and redhead, nest on the larger ponds and adjacent wet meadows. Most species may be observed during the entire summer season. Fall migration reaches its height in late September or early October when up to 8,000 waterfowl may be on the refuge.Moose–(North America) or Eurasian elk (Europe) (Alces alces) is the largest extant species in the deer family. Moose are distinguished by the palmate antlers of the males; other members of the family have antlers with a dendritic ("twig-like") configuration. Moose typically inhabit boreal and mixed deciduous forests of the Northern Hemisphere in temperate to subarctic climates. Moose used to have a much wider range but hunting and other human activities greatly reduced it over the years. Moose have been re-introduced to some of their former habitats. Their diet consist of both terrestrial and aquatic vegetation. The most common moose predators are wolves, bears, and humans. Unlike most other deer species, moose are solitary animals and do not form herds. Although generally slow moving and sedentary, moose can become aggressive and move surprisingly fast if angered or startled. Their mating season in the autumn can lead to spectacular fights between males competing for the right to mate with a particular female.Antelope–The Pronghorn of North America, though sometimes known colloquially as Pronghorn Antelope, is not a member of the family Bovidae, but the family Antilocapridae and not a true antelope. No antelope species are native to the Americas. True antelope have horns which are unbranched and never shed, while Pronghorns have branching horns, and shed annually.
Rocky Mountain National ParkHaving lived in Loveland for a year we were frequent visitors of RMNP. This was our final stop on our Colorado tour and the first time we were able to take three of our children.Having lived in Loveland for a year we were frequent visitors of RMNP. This was our final stop on our Colorado tour and the first time we were able to take three of our children.Wiki: Rocky Mountain National Park–A national park located in the north-central region of the U.S. state of Colorado. It features majestic mountain views, a variety of wildlife, varied climates and environments—from wooded forests to mountain tundra—and easy access to back-country trails and campsites. The park is located northwest of Boulder, Colorado, in the Rockies, and includes the Continental Divide and the headwaters of the Colorado River.
Cades Cove: Great Smoky Mountain National ParkCades Cove attracts some two million visitors a year. Take a tour of the eleven mile loop and you will quickly see why. Eleven historic sites featuring homesteads, mills and churches serve as backdrop to a surprising array of wildlife. White tail dear, black bear, coyote and a variety of other birds and mammals can be seen from the comfort of ones car, which, is where most people stay. Despite the large crowds a brief walk down quiet path or an open field is all that is needed to find some quiet solitude.
Cataloochee Valley: Great Smoky Mountain National ParkCataloochee Valley is a secluded corner of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. A few historical structures dot the landscape as reminders of the once thriving community that existed here. Due to it's relative solitude, no paved roads service the valley, it was selected for the reintroduction of 25 Elk in 2001. Absent since the mid 1700's, the Elk have adapted well to the valley and are slowly expanding into other areas of the park. Vivid colors and bugling Elk make fall is an excellent time to visit. 
Fontana: Great Smoky Mountain National ParkThe fourth in a series of clips from a year long documentation project of the Smoky Mountain National Park. These were taken on one of our biannual trips into the park via kayak/Fontana lake. The freshwater jellyfish were out (1:59) and so were the fall colors.Enjoy.Music: Summerfugl by Jan Grünfeld (myspace.com/jangruenfeld)
WildMusic is by by Chris Zabriskie (chriszabriskie.com)"God never made an ugly landscape. All that the sun shines on is beautiful, so long as it is wild."- John Muir, Atlantic Monthly, January 1869.A compilation of our recent wilderness adventures. Locations include Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Rocky Mountain National Park, North Park, Co., Mount Evans, Co., and Badlands National Park.Series shorts at: vimeo.com/channels/34719
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